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Richmond Falcon Cam

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  1. Thursday, July 31, 2014

    Pen Removal

    This morning we disassembled the pen, cleaned out the nest box and filled it with fresh gravel.  We also made adjustments to the position of the camera in order to enable better future viewing of some of the perch sites that are used by the falcons on nearby buildings.  At one point the adult female flew by us, landing on the west-facing sign of the Bank of America building, and was joined shortly after by the adult male.  In addition to finding prey remains inside the nest box, we found many in a section of the ledge on the west-facing side of the building, out of view of the camera.  This appears to act as an area where prey are processed, consumed and cached by the adults.  Among the remains we identified several yellow-billed cuckoos, two common grackles, a blue jay and a blue grosbeak.

    image

    adult falcon pair on ‘O’ (female) and ‘R’ (male) of sign

  2. Wednesday, July 23, 2014

    Injured Peregrine Update July 23

    A new status update on the injured juvenile peregrine falcon is available from the Wildlife Center of Virginia at http://wildlifecenter.org/critter-corner/current-patients/peregrine-falcon-14-1319.

  3. Monday, July 21, 2014

    Injured Peregrine Update July 21

    The latest status update on the injured juvenile peregrine falcon is available from the Wildlife Center of Virginia at http://wildlifecenter.org/critter-corner/current-patients/peregrine-falcon-14-1319.

  4. Wednesday, July 9, 2014

    Injured Peregrine Update July 9

    A new update on the status of the injured juvenile peregrine falcon is available from the Wildlife Center of Virginia at http://wildlifecenter.org/critter-corner/current-patients/peregrine-falcon-14-1319.

  5. Monday, June 30, 2014

    Injured Peregrine Update June 30

    Here is the latest update on the injured juvenile peregrine falcon from the Wildlife Center of Virginia: http://wildlifecenter.org/critter-corner/current-patients/peregrine-falcon-14-1319.

  6. Monday, June 23, 2014

    Injured Peregrine Update June 23

    Another update on the status of the injured juvenile peregrine falcon is available from the Wildlife Center of Virginia at http://wildlifecenter.org/critter-corner/current-patients/peregrine-falcon-14-1319.

  7. Friday, June 20, 2014

    Injured Peregrine Update June 20

    The injured juvenile falcon was received this morning at the Wildlife Center of Virginia.  They have made available the following update on their website: http://wildlifecenter.org/critter-corner/current-patients/peregrine-falcon-14-1319.

  8. Thursday, June 19, 2014

    Juvenile Peregrine Injured

    A dose of bad news early this afternoon - Richmond Animal Control responded to calls of a grounded peregrine falcon near Two James Center in downtown Richmond at 12:30 pm.  The bird was transported to a local veterinary clinic with wildlife experience, where it was confirmed to be the juvenile with the yellow-taped band.  A preliminary exam revealed that the left eye was injured and that the tip of the upper bill was missing.  The bird will be transported to the Wildlife Center of Virginia.  We will post updates as they become available.

  9. Wednesday, June 18, 2014

    FledgeWatch Concluded

    It was a day that was even hotter than yesterday, but that did not preclude DGIF personnel and a dedicated volunteer from observing some good bouts of flying from the two juveniles.  The juvenile with the yellow tape was spotted this morning on the ledge of her natal building, though far from the nest box.  This bird was seen flying on a number of occasions, at one point making a somewhat precarious landing on the letter ‘e’ of the signage on the side of one building.  Although she partially slid behind the letter, suspended by her wings and with her legs dangling below her, she righted herself into a proper perching stance within a few seconds.  Initial concerns that she may have injured her wing were allayed when she later flew strongly and decisively.  Her sibling likewise was seen in flight several times.  During the monitoring we also observed the adult female presenting one of the juveniles with a whole prey item on a roof top, which the juvenile proceeded to pluck and then consume out of sight.  With both juveniles accounted for and flying well, we are pleased to declare this year’s falcon breeding season an all-around success, and to officially close the FledgeWatch monitoring period.  As the young falcons will remain in the area for several weeks, we may receive additional reports and will post items of interest.  Once again, thanks to all volunteers who participated this year!

  10. Tuesday, June 17, 2014

    FledgeWatch Day 1 Update

    On a very hot day in Richmond, the two young peregrine falcons have both successfully flown from their natal building.  The pen door was opened remotely at 9:30 a.m., and within 3 minutes one of the birds had already made a short flight and then alighted back on the ledge around the corner from the nest box.  She was soon joined on the ledge by her sibling, who did not fly.  The juvenile with the yellow tape flew more decisively from that building at 11:48 a.m., and, after a few failed landing attempts on nearby buildings, chose as her perch spot for the next few hours an actively moving crane towering over a nearby construction site.  Her sibling flew at 11:52 a.m., unsuccessfully trying to follow the adult male to a favored perch site on a building sign.  After a brief visit back to the Riverfront Plaza West Tower, this juvenile bird flew again and landed on a large air handling unit on a building in the vicinity of the crane, where she was out of sight for the majority of the observation period to follow.  At 2:30 p.m. the yellow-taped bird flew from the crane to the nearby Dominion Building, and left again an hour later, performing a series of short flights to and from nearby buildings.  She was eventually observed on an I-beam at the construction site, where she remained for some time before flying out of sight.  The FledgeWatch ended at 6 p.m. and will resume tomorrow morning, as DGIF personnel and volunteers will monitor the young birds once more to ensure that they are both flying and landing consistently and without problems.  A big thank you to the four volunteers who participated in today’s FledgeWatch!